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Drexel Hill (484) 521-0233
West Chester (610) 436-5883

Monday, 19 October 2020 00:00

High heels have become notorious for creating issues with the feet. One common struggle many women face when choosing to wear high heels is that they often develop blisters on their toes or on the back of their heels. If the high heels you are wearing are slightly too big, it will cause friction with the skin of your feet, causing blisters to form. Blisters can be incredibly uncomfortable, and often painful, making it difficult to walk. Some women apply bandages to their heels or toes to limit the amount of friction between the shoes and skin. For more advice on how to prevent blisters while wearing high heels, please speak with a podiatrist.

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM of Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 12 October 2020 00:00

Bunions that develop in young children are referred to as juvenile hallux valgus. They may exist as a result of genetic traits, or from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Noticeable signs that your child may have a bunion can include a bony protrusion that forms on the side of the big toe, and red and swollen appearance. A proper diagnosis can consist of having an X-ray taken, as this may help to determine how severe the bunion is. When the bunion is identified at an early stage, it may be effective to use non-surgical techniques to obtain mild relief. These can include wearing shoes that have a wide toe area, or using custom-made insoles that may help to alleviate pressure. If your child has a bunion, it is strongly suggested that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM of Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 05 October 2020 00:00

Stress fractures are small hairline fractures that usually occur due to the foot no longer being able to handle the load being placed on it. This is a common result of overuse and repetitive motion, and leads to an increased risk of stress fractures for athletes such as runners, soccer players and dancers. Those who suffer from health problems such as osteoporosis or an abnormal gait are also at a higher risk for developing a stress fracture. While stress fractures can happen in any bone in the foot, they most commonly occur in 3 places: the metatarsal bones (near the mid foot), the calcaneus bone (or heel bone), or the navicular bone (top of the foot). Common symptoms of a stress fracture include tenderness, pain deep in the foot, weakness, intermittent pain, changes in foot biomechanics, sharp pain, swelling and bruising. If you are experiencing these symptoms, it is important to consult with a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 28 September 2020 00:00

People who enjoy sporting activities are often aware of how a broken toe can slow or stop participation. A broken toe can occur as a result of dropping a heavy object on it, or from jamming it against a piece of furniture. Common signs of an existing broken toe can include severe pain, swelling, and bruising. In severe fractures, the bone may extend from the skin, and immediate medical attention is needed. Many doctors will use the buddy taping method, which consists of taping the broken toe to the toe next to it. This can be helpful in providing the necessary stability as the healing process occurs. Simple stretches can be performed which may be beneficial in keeping the toes strong. If you have broken your toe, please speak with a podiatrist who can guide you toward the correct treatment.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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