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Drexel Hill (484) 521-0233
West Chester (610) 436-5883

August 2020

Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

Why Is My Toenail Discolored?

A contagious foot condition that affects the toes is known as toenail fungus. One of the most common symptoms related to toenail fungus is the discoloration of the affected toenail. Toenails may have a whitish to yellowish spot on the affected toenail. When not treated promptly, the symptoms and fungus can easily spread from toe to toe. Other symptoms can include the nail thickening, becoming brittle and crumbly, or taking on a distorted shape. Fungus thrives in warm and moist environments, so it is important to ensure that you have the proper footwear on while in locations such as communal swimming pools or locker room areas. Wearing proper footwear may help to prevent you from getting this condition. For more advice on how to treat toenail fungus, please consult with a podiatrist.

For more information about treatment, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM of Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Toenail Fungus Treatment

Toenail fungus is a condition that affects many people and can be especially hard to get rid of. Fortunately, there are several methods to go about treating and avoiding it.

Antifungals & Deterrence

Oral antifungal medicine has been shown to be effective in many cases. It is important to consult with a podiatrist to determine the proper regiment for you, or potentially explore other options.

Applying foot powder on the feet and shoes helps keep the feet free of moisture and sweat.

Sandals or open toed shoes – Wearing these will allow air movement and help keep feet dry. They also expose your feet to light, which fungus cannot tolerate. Socks with moisture wicking material also help as well.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Toenail Fungus

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor blood flow to the lower extremities. This is due to a buildup of plaque along the walls of the arteries, causing them to narrow and become stiff and thus restricting blood flow. According to a recent study, people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disorder that affects the joints, appear to be at an increased risk of developing PAD. Fortunately, both PAD and RA can be managed. A podiatrist can screen for PAD and recommend treatment options for both conditions. If you have poor circulation to your lower limbs or arthritic joint pain in your feet and ankles, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Monday, 17 August 2020 00:00

Possible Symptoms of an Ingrown Toenail

An ingrown toenail is defined as the outside edges of the nail growing into the surrounding skin, instead of over the skin. The big toe is generally affected the most, but it can occur in any of the toes. If it is not promptly treated it may become infected, which can be accompanied by pus drainage, redness, and often swelling. Common causes of this ailment can include genetics and wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Patients have found mild relief when the affected foot is soaked in warm water, and this is generally helpful in softening the skin. This can be followed by inserting a small piece of cotton between the nail and skin, which can be beneficial in lifting the nail off of the skin. If you are afflicted with an ingrown toenail, it is strongly recommended that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can offer you the best treatment options.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM of Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Sever’s Disease: An Overuse Injury

Sever’s disease, also known as calcaneal apophysitis, is not a disease at all, but rather an overuse injury. This condition affects the growth plate of the heel bone and is therefore most common in children and teenagers who are still rapidly growing. Sever’s disease causes inflammation in the heel, stiffness in the foot, and pain when standing, walking, running or jumping that usually improves with rest. Children who are involved in sports are the most at risk for developing Sever’s disease because they put frequent, repetitive pressure on the heel. Other risk factors for developing this condition include wearing ill-fitting shoes, having flat arches or pronated feet, and obesity. If your child is experiencing heel pain and stiffness, it is recommended that you take them to a podiatrist for treatment.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

Signs and Symptoms of Cuboid Syndrome

The pain and discomfort that is located on the outside of the foot may be indicative of a condition that is known as cuboid syndrome. It can occur as a result of a partial dislocation of the cuboid bone, and may happen for a variety of reasons including a sprained ankle, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or running on uneven surfaces. A common symptom that patients experience from this ailment can consist of pain on the outer edge of the foot, and it is often worse while standing. Mild relief may be found when specific strengthening exercises are performed, and it may help to wear custom-made orthotics. If you have pain in this part of your foot, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist who will be able to treat this condition effectively.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
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