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Drexel Hill (484) 521-0233
West Chester (610) 436-5883

January 2022

Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

How Did I Get a Foot Wart?

Plantar warts are rough growths that appear on the skin of the foot in response to a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. This virus can enter the body through cuts or cracks in the skin. You can come in contact with HPV through direct skin-to-skin contact with an infected person, or through indirect contact with an infected surface, such as the towels, socks, shoes, or personal hygiene products of somebody who is carrying the virus. Warmth and moisture contribute to the virus’ growth, which is why people who wear closed shoes and socks and those who have sweaty feet are more likely to develop plantar warts. Plantar warts typically occur on parts of the foot that experience pressure and friction, such as the balls and heels of the feet. If you have a plantar wart, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

The band of tissue that supports the arch, running along the bottom of the foot and connecting the heel to the toes, is known as the plantar fascia. When this ligament becomes inflamed or strained, the injury is known as plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Patients who are commonly affected by plantar fasciitis include those who are middle aged, frequently on their feet, overweight, or have tight Achilles tendons. Plantar fasciitis is usually at its worst in the morning after getting out of bed or after resting for a long period of time. If you are suffering from heel pain that may be plantar fasciitis, it’s suggested that you consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis of your pain and effective treatment plan.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

Don’t Ignore Them - Stretch!

The many muscles in the feet and toes are often neglected during a typical workout. But just as any other muscle in the body, they require stretching and strengthening to function properly. This is especially true if you are a runner or involved in other activities that keep you on your feet. Ignoring your feet during warmups and workouts can lead to foot injuries and pain later on, so it is suggested that you stretch your feet three to four times per week. One very simple exercise that you can do is roll a tennis ball under your foot. This helps stretch and relax the muscles on the bottom of your foot. For more information about the benefits of foot stretches, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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