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Drexel Hill (484) 521-0233
West Chester (610) 436-5883

January 2021

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor circulation and often affects the lower limbs. Taking good care of your feet is vital when it comes to living with PAD, as poor circulation in the feet can make it difficult for any sores or wounds on the feet to heal. To maintain the health of your feet, it is recommended that you wash your feet daily, dry them thoroughly, and apply moisturizer. This helps prevent cracks in the skin, which can lead to infection. Wearing shoes and socks that fit well and are comfortable and supportive, trimming the toenails properly, and examining the feet daily for any abnormalities is also important to prevent foot damage and to detect any problems early. For more information about foot care for people with PAD, please consult with a podiatrist.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Monday, 18 January 2021 00:00

Removing Hard Skin on the Foot

A callus is a thick, toughened section of skin that often forms on the ball of the foot, as this area bears the most weight when you walk or stand. A corn is a callus that is made of dead skin and often develops on the tops or sides of toes. Corns and calluses are the skin’s natural response to excess friction or pressure. They develop to protect the raw skin underneath. While corns and calluses can be uncomfortable, they are rarely dangerous. Hard skin on the feet usually responds well to home treatment. Soaking, exfoliating, and moisturizing the feet can help smooth the skin. In some cases the hard skin may require medical treatment. For example, if the hardened skin causes pain or cracks and becomes infected, it should be examined by a podiatrist. For more information about how to deal with hard skin on the feet please consult with a podiatrist. 

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM of Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses
Monday, 11 January 2021 00:00

Weight and the Joints of the Feet

Osteoarthritis is a condition that causes the lining of the joints to break down over time. This type of arthritis frequently affects the small joints of the feet and ankles. One of the factors that can increase your risk of developing osteoarthritis and joint pain is being overweight or obese. Because the joints of the lower limbs bear the weight of the entire body, they can become increasingly damaged from carrying excess weight. Losing weight may help prevent osteoarthritis in those who do not yet have it and can reduce the severity of arthritis symptoms and prevent further damage in those who do. If you have osteoarthritis in your feet or ankles, a podiatrist can help you manage this condition.

The more you weigh, the harder your feet must work to support your body. If you’re an obese individual and are concerned about your feet, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Obesity and Your Feet

People who are overweight are putting more pressure on their ankles, knees, and hips as well as their feet. This unfortunately can lead to variety of different issues.

Problems & Complications Stemming from Obesity

  • When the body is overweight, it tries to compensate by changing the way that it moves. An obese person may lean forward and put extra weight on the wrong part of the foot. This puts unnecessary stress on the feet.
  • Obese people are also more likely to develop type II diabetes which is a condition that causes a lot of foot problems. People with diabetes often don’t feel the cuts and sores that they may have on their feet, which can lead to more complicated and severe issues.
  • Plantar fasciitis is another foot condition that can be caused by obesity. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, which causes pain and stiffness while walking and climbing stairs.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Obesity and the Feet
Monday, 04 January 2021 00:00

How Can I Find Relief From Cracked Heels?

Cracked heels affect many people worldwide. When the cracks deepen and become uncomfortable, they can be called fissures. This ailment can develop as a result of wearing shoes that have an open back. Additionally, patients can notice they have cracked heels from standing on hard surfaces for the majority of the day. Existing medical conditions that can contribute to causing this condition can include psoriasis and eczema. Mild relief may be found when the affected foot is soaked in warm water, and followed by applying a good moisturizer. Additionally, it may be beneficial to drink fresh water daily, and this may aid in reducing cracked heels from forming. If you have developed cracked heels, please speak to a podiatrist for effective prevention methods and healing techniques.

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact Julie Siegerman, DPM from Dr. Siegerman & Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Drexel Hill and West Chester, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
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